Posts Tagged "MOONBIRD Phillip Hoose"

Save the Red Knot! Sign the Petition!

Posted by on Dec 9, 2013 in Moonbird & Rufa Red Knots | 0 comments

Save the Red Knot!  Sign the Petition!

If you have read the book Moonbird by Phillip Hoose, you know that one individual bird has had incredible staying power while his species is under great threat.  You can help the Red Knot. The US Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed to protect the Red Knot rufa under the Endangered Species Act. Doing so would not only benefit the Red Knot, but other shorebirds since many other species have similar long migrations and are declining due to habitat pressures. But in order for The FWS to follow through on this recommendation to turn into a real listing your help is needed. WILL YOU SIGN THE PETITION? Thanks to the Friends of the Red Knot for initiating this...

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B95 Spotted in Rio Grande

Posted by on Dec 9, 2013 in Moonbird & Rufa Red Knots | 1 comment

B95 Spotted in Rio Grande

Patricia M. González of the Global Flyway Network in South America sent author Phillip Hoose this astounding news about B95… “This afternoon Allan Baker, Luis Benegas and myself saw B95 in the shores of Rio Grande in Tierra del Fuego.  It was a great surprise as last year we did not see him in the area. Allan managed to get few pictures when the bird went ahead from the flock of about 110 knots. It was a nice luck as we don’t have many pictures of B95 in basic plumage. The flag is fading but still is possible to recognize the bird because the color band combination with a black band in the right lower leg (from 1995) and an newer orange band in the lower left leg (from a retrap in Rio Grande). This was a great news for Rio Grande city as you probably know B95 was declared natural ambassador of this city and they will build a monument with his story.”...

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List Red Knot as a Threatened Species?

Posted by on Sep 30, 2013 in Moonbird & Rufa Red Knots | 0 comments

List Red Knot as a Threatened Species?

Readers of Phillip Hoose’s bird biography, Moonbird: A Year of the Wind with the Great Survivor B95 will cheer to hear that the  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to list the red knot as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. Read the release below and note the address for public comment.  You can make a difference for B95 and his descendents! U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Proposes to List Red Knot as a Threatened Species Under the Endangered Species Act Declining food supply and habitat are seen as threats for a remarkable shorebird that migrates thousands of miles each year The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today released a proposal to list the rufa red knot (Calidris canutus rufa), a robin-sized shorebird that annually migrates from the Canadian Arctic to southern Argentina, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.  The proposed rule will be available for 60 days of public comment. “The rufa red knot is an extraordinary bird that each year migrates thousands of miles from the Arctic to the tip of South America and back, but – like many shorebirds – it is vulnerable to climate and other environmental changes,” said Service Director Dan Ashe. “In some areas, knot populations have declined by about 75 percent since the 1980s, with the steepest declines happening after 2000. We look forward to hearing from the public with any new scientific information as we consider the proposal.” After an exhaustive scientific review of the species and its habitat, Service biologists determined that the knot meets the definition of threatened, meaning it is likely to become in danger of extinction in the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. The knot, whose range includes 25 countries and 40 U.S. states, uses spring and fall stopover areas along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Changing climate conditions are already affecting the bird’s food supply, the timing of its migration and its breeding habitat in the Arctic. The shorebird also is losing areas along its range due to sea level rise, shoreline projects, and development. A primary factor in the recent decline of the species was reduced food supplies in Delaware Bay due to commercial harvest of horseshoe crabs. In 2012, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission adopted a management framework that explicitly ties horseshoe crab harvest levels along the Atlantic Coast to knot recovery targets. The Service’s analysis shows that although the horseshoe crab population has not yet fully rebounded, the framework should ensure no further threat to the knot from the crab harvest. International, state and local governments, the conservation community, beachgoers and land managers are helping ensure knots have safe areas to winter, rest and feed before or along their journey to the Arctic. These partners assist knots in a variety of ways, including managing disturbance in key habitats, improving management of hunting outside the U.S. and collecting data to better understand the knot. In many cases, the knot’s U.S. coastal range overlaps with those of loggerhead sea turtles and piping plovers, as well as other shorebirds. Conservation actions underway to benefit those species’ coastal habitats will also benefit knots. The bird is one of the longest-distance migrants in the animal kingdom. With wingspans of 20 inches, some knots fly more than 9,300 miles from south to north every spring and repeat the trip in reverse every autumn. While migrating between wintering grounds at the southern tip of South America in Tierra del Fuego and breeding grounds in the Canadian Arctic, the shorebird can be found in groups of a few individuals to thousands...

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Moonbird Spotted!

Posted by on May 17, 2013 in Moonbird & Rufa Red Knots | 3 comments

Moonbird Spotted!

A shout of joy went through the birding community on 5/16/13 when B95 aka Moonbird, the subject of Phillip Hoose’s book Moonbird was spotted again on Delaware Bay.  Read about it the Philadelphia Inquirer...

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Moonbird by Proxy

Posted by on Apr 17, 2013 in Moonbird & Rufa Red Knots | 0 comments

Marvelous blogger Barb Middleton of Reading Rumpus Book Reviews‘s husband read Moonbird by proxy. “This expository text is so engaging that I kept spitting out facts to my husband as I was being wowed by this tiny creature that performs feats that don’t seem possible. Did you know that this bird eats 14 times it’s weight and manages to fly? Did you know in 2009 scientists invented geolocators so lightweight and small that they can track bird migration? Did you know that horseshoe crab blood is used to make sure medical equipment is sterilized? Did you know… the poor guy won’t have to read the book after me being a chatterbox of nonstop facts through 120 pages…” Thanks to Barb for reading and posting such an awesome review and thanks to her husband for getting the B95 report via the...

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